Courses Taught

Undergraduate Courses Taught at UCF

Note: all syllabi (by semester) are available on UCF Anthropology website

History of Anthropological Thought (ANT 4034)

Anthropology as a discipline has an extraordinarily diverse and rich intellectual history. Anthropologists have come a long way from their beginnings at the end of the 19th century when of primary interest was the study of “exotic” people and the discipline was implicated in the European colonial domination. In the second half of the 20th century, anthropology underwent intense transformations as a result of critiques and challenges emerging both inside and outside of the discipline, and as a result of new intellectual currents forming in social sciences and the world at large. Thus, present-day anthropology is vastly different from its 19th century beginnings in terms of theory, methods, and with respect to how anthropology is used. Moreover, contemporary anthropology draws on a number of other intellectual traditions, in particular gender studies and history, and participates in intellectual discussions across disciplinary boundaries. Rather than attempting to cover every “school of thought” since the 19th century, this course focuses on key theoretical currents that have been significant to the way anthropology is done today. Some of the earlier theories presented in the first half of the course are important to understand as the historical backdrop against which new thinking emerged. The latter half of the course will focus on major present-day debates in anthropology, including globalization, political economy, neoliberalization, human rights, and ethics. At the end of the course we will closely examine how these themes emerge in an award-winning contemporary ethnography that intertwines several theoretical paradigms. Teaching schedule: every spring.

Global Health in Anthropological Perspective (ANT 4480)

This course explores global health issues from an anthropological and cross-cultural perspective with a focus on the relationship between local experiences of health, global health governance, and the question of health as a justice issue. Therefore, the course examines how experiences of suffering and illness are situated in multiple moral and political economies. Specifically, it considers the intended and unintended effects of global forces and phenomena including globalization, “pharmaceuticalization,” the politics of humanitarian aid, water security, globalization of fast food, as well as racial, gender, and class politics related to health. Some of the global health problems we’ll considers are emergent “superbugs” and other infectious diseases, HIV/AIDS, type 2 diabetes, mental health, refugee and migrant health, vaccines, and malnutrition. This course also examines international health interventions as well as contributions of anthropological insights in these settings. Teaching schedule: every fall.

This class counts toward:

  • Global Health Certificate
  • Medical Anthropology Minor
  • Diversity Credit
  • students completing this course are eligible for: Global Health Internship in Haiti

Culture, Disease, and Healing (ANT 4408)

This course focuses on the role of culture in shaping the experiences and perceptions of health, sickness, and well-being in a variety of contexts. Using engaging contemporary ethnographies, the course explores cultural notions of disease and wellness, the dilemmas of cross-cultural (mis)communication in healthcare settings, and emerging global health concerns. Specifically, the course will include topics of reproduction and sexuality, HIV/AIDS, illegal organ trade, in vitro fertilization, refugee health, mental health, and the questions of stigma, marginality, and citizenship as they relate to health and illness. We will use examples, from the US, Russia, Ireland, Haiti, South Africa, Poland, Egypt, and other locations. Teaching schedule: every other spring.

This class counts toward:

  • Global Health Certificate
  • Medical Anthropology Minor
  • Diversity Credit
  • students completing this course are eligible for: Global Health Internship in Haiti

Engagement & Social Change: Public Anthropology (ANT 3701)

This course will explore how anthropological knowledge, skills, and methods contribute to the understanding of contemporary human concerns related to health, migration, globalization, human rights, and development. As the most rapidly expanding field in anthropology, applied (or public) anthropological strives to bring public and policy attention to concerns that are often hidden or marginalized. In the words of anthropologist Robert Borofsky, it strives “to move beyond the traditional ‘do no harm’ ethos of funded research to one that strives to do good, to one that focuses on helping others.” To this end, in part, we’ll consider how anthropology can be engaged with the community. The course will also explore the ethics of anthropological endeavors from a historical perspective. Teaching Schedule: Every Other Fall.

This class counts toward:

  • Gordon Rule Requirement (UCF writing requirement)
  • Global Health Certificate
  • Medical Anthropology Minor

Public and Applied Anthropology Seminar (ANG 6701)

This course will explore the utility of anthropological knowledge, skills, theories, and methods in bringing attention to and addressing contemporary human concerns related to health, globalization, migration, human rights, environmental damage, and poverty. Public and applied (or public interest) anthropologists’ engagement with these concerns, working inside and outside of academia, is driven by the commitment to social justice and equity, as well as bringing attention to the experiences of marginalized and invisible communities. In other words, public anthropology addresses public problems, in particular those that can be addressed by improvements in public policies. Thus, we will also examine the ways in which anthropological analyses and their results can be made more accessible and used in informing and re-framing public and policy debates. Finally, we will consider how specific anthropological work can be relevant outside of its own discipline and what it can offer to interdisciplinary scholarship and interventions conducted in public interest. Teaching schedule: every other fall.

Writing in Anthropology (ANG 5094)

Anthropology requires a distinctive style of writing in terms of engagement with literature, crafting of arguments, as well as the style of expression, quoting, and reporting results.  This seminar aims to help graduate anthropology students to develop their scholarly writing skills in a structured and supportive atmosphere by utilizing a peer-review system and the assistance of a faculty member in providing feedback and guidance.  The subdisciplines of cultural, biological anthropology, and archaeology each cultivate some distinct characteristics, in particular for presenting results and the degree of engagement with theory.  These characteristics will be highlighted so that students in particular subdisciplines can maximize the usefulness of the workshop for their own benefit. Teaching Schedule: Every Spring.

Other Courses

The following courses involve independent and collaborative work with my graduate MA or PhD students or undergraduate honors students who are doing their own research.

  • Directed Research (ANG 6918)
  • Honors Thesis (ANT 4971H)
  • MA Thesis (ANG 6971) or ANG 7980 Dissertation Research

These are courses I once taught but are now typically covered by other faculty:

  • Ethnographic Research methods (ANG 6801)
  • Sex, Gender and Culture (ANT 3302)
  • Cultural Anthropology: Global Perspectives, Local Contexts (ANT 2410)
  • Multi-Sited Research Methods: Europe (ANG 6908)
  • Language & Culture (ANT 3610)